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Statutory Benefits

CT Paid Family & Medical Leave Benefits

What does CT Paid Family & Medical Leave Provide?

Connecticut’s Paid Family & Medical Leave (PFML) program provides eligible employees with up to 12 weeks partially paid time off to care for or bond with someone, or for the employee’s own self-care.

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Leave can be taken for the following reasons:

CARE FOR SOMEONE ELSE SELF-CARE

Bonding Leave icon

Bonding Leave

Caregiver Leave icon

Caregiver Leave

Military Exigency Leave icon

Military Exigency Leave

Self-Care icon



  • Bonding with a new child (birth, adoption, or foster-care placement)

  • Caring for a family member with a serious health condition
  • To care for a military family member who is injured during active duty

  • For any qualifying exigency, arising out of the fact that the spouse, son, daughter or parent of the employee is on active duty, or has been notified of an impending call or order to active duty, in the armed forces
  • The employee’s own serious health condition
    • The employee may be entitled to two additional weeks of benefits for incapacitation during pregnancy
  • To serve as an organ or bone marrow donor
  • If an employee is experiencing family violence, they can apply to take up to 12 days of leave

    

How much is The CT Paid Family & Medical Leave
Benefit Amount?

Whether for self-care or to care for or a family member, the weekly benefit is the same. The maximum benefit as of July 1, 2022 is $840/week, but the actual amount depends on various factors and is calculated with a combination of the covered employee’s base weekly earnings and the CT minimum wage as follows1:

 

Base Weekly Earnings2 Corresponding Benefit Calculation
Up to $5602
(40 times the CT minimum wage) 
95% of the base weekly earnings
To a max of $532
More than $560
(40 times the CT minimum wage)
95% of the base weekly earnings ($532) + 60% of base weekly earnings that exceed $560 Capped at currently $8402
(60 times the CT minimum wage)*

 

1 For claims starting on or after 7/1/22. Claims starting prior to 7/1 are calculated with the prior minimum wage values.
2 The base weekly earnings threshold is based on “40 times the CT minimum wage”, which equates to $520/week between January and June 2022, increased to $560 on July 1, 2022, and is anticipated to increase to $600 on June 1, 2023.The benefit cap is based on “60 times the CT minimum wage” comes out to $780/week between January and June 2022, increased to $840 on July 1, 2022, and is anticipated to increase to $900 on June 1, 2023. The PFML Authority notes that it reserves the right to reduce benefits if revenue is insufficient.

 


What form of wages count as base weekly earnings? 

Base weekly earnings are comprised of taxable compensation subject to FICA calculations.  This may include salary, wages, tips, bonuses, commissions, and taxable fringe benefits. IRS Publication 15-B has a chart of various fringe benefits that are subject to FICA and those that are exempt. Retirement, pension payments, and 401k distributions are not considered wages for the purpose of determining base weekly earnings.  For benefit calculations, ShelterPoint* will only consider the employee’s wages earned with its insured employer.

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Let's look at some examples3


Example 1
Earnings: $500 /wk

Benefits
$475 /wk

 

Example 1
Earnings of $500 per week


Simply take 95% of $500

So, the Paid Family & Medical Leave weekly benefit would be
$475.


 

For earnings above the $560 threshold, more steps are required to figure out the benefit amount. Compare to the benefit cap of $840(if the total from step 4 is less, that’s the weekly benefit amount; if the employee earns more and the total is higher than the benefit cap, the benefit is limited to $840).

Example 2
Earnings: $1,000 /wk2

Benefits
$796 /wk

 

Example 2
Earnings of $1,000 per week2


Step 1 multiply the threshold by 95% 95% of $560 = $532
Step 2 take the difference between the weekly earnings and the $560 threshold $1,000 - $560 = $440
Step 3 multiply that amount by 60% 60% of $440 = $264
Step 4 add the 2 amounts from steps 1 and 3 $796
Step 5 compare to the benefit cap of $840
(in this case the benefit doesn’t exceed the cap, so no further steps needed)
     
So, the Paid Family & Medical Leave weekly benefit would be
$796.

 

Example 3
Earnings: $1,500 /wk2

Benefits
$840 /wk

 

Example 3
Earnings of $1,500 per week2


Step 1 multiply the threshold by 95% 95% of $560 = $532
Step 2 take the difference between the weekly earnings and the $560 threshold $1,500 - $560 = $940
Step 3 multiply that amount by 60% 60% of $940 = $564
Step 4 add the 2 amounts from steps 1 and 3 $1,096
Step 5 compare to the benefit cap of $8402
(in this case the benefit exceeds the cap, so one further step needed)
 
Step 6 Determine whether to use the actual benefit amount or Cap? Cap at $840
     
So, the Paid Family & Medical Leave weekly benefit would be
$840.
Bookmark icon
PFML Expert Tip:

One thing to remember, once the weekly earnings hit $1,073 the benefit will remain at $8402 for leaves beginning 7/1/22 to 5/31/23.

 

2 The base weekly earnings threshold is based on “40 times the CT minimum wage”, which equates to $520/week between January and June 2022, increased to $560 on July 1, 2022, and is anticipated to increase to $600 on June 1, 2023.The benefit cap is based on “60 times the CT minimum wage” comes out to $780/week between January and June 2022, increased to $840 on July 1, 2022, and is anticipated to increase to $900 on June 1, 2023. The PFML Authority notes that it reserves the right to reduce benefits if revenue is insufficient.

3 These examples are for illustrative purposes only and are not intended to be a guarantee of coverage or actual benefit amount. Claims are determined based upon the specific details of each claim upon submission of the claim. For claims beginning on or after July 1, 2022.

 


    
 
What is the Benefit Duration in a 12-month period?

Bonding Leave icon
Bonding Leave


Up to
12 WEEKS






Giving Care icon
Caregiving Leave


Up to
12 WEEKS4






Military Exigency icon
Military Exigency Leave

Up to
12 WEEKS




Self Care icon
Self-Care

12  WEEKS
Plus
The employee may be entitled to two additional weeks of benefits for incapacitation during pregnancy. If an employee is experiencing family violence, they can apply to take up to 12 days of leave.

 

 

4While an employee may take up to 26 weeks of leave to care for a family member who was injured on active military duty, only 12 weeks of that leave is eligible for paid benefits from the CT Paid Leave Authority or ShelterPoint (if ShelterPoint is the private plan carrier.)

 

 


CT Paid Family & Medical Leave Benefits FAQs

 

Who is a “covered family member” under CT PFML law?

Covered family members include:
  • spousex
  • sibling
  • child
  • grandparent
  • grandchild
  • parent
  • an individual related to the employee by blood or affinity, whose close association with the employee shows to be the equivalent of those family relationships.

Is there a waiting period to receive CT PFML benefits?

No, there is no waiting period. An eligible employee may receive benefits from the first day of leave.

What is considered a “serious health condition”?

A serious health condition is an illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition that involves (A) Inpatient Care in a hospital, hospice, nursing home or residential medical care facility; or (B) Continuing Treatment, including outpatient treatment, by a Health Care Provider. A person has a serious health condition if they have one or more of the following conditions listed below.

  1. Inpatient care: an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, nursing home, or residential medical care facility. This may also include any subsequent treatment in connection with the inpatient care. Leave is covered even if the surgery is elective but requires an overnight stay.

  2. Continuing treatment by a Health Care Provider (one or more of the following)
    1. Incapacity5 and treatment: (including pregnancy) A period of incapacity of more than 3 consecutive calendar days, and any subsequent treatment or period of incapacity relating to the same condition, but it must also involve:
      1. Two or more in-person visits to a health care provider or by a nurse or physician’s assistant under direct supervision of a health care provider, or by a provider of health care services (e.g. physical therapist) under orders of, or on referral by, a health care provider for treatment within 30 days of the first day of incapacity, unless extenuating circumstances exist.
      2. At least one in-person visit to a health care provider for treatment within seven days of the first day of incapacity, which results in a regimen of continuing treatment under the supervision of the health care provider.

    2. Chronic conditions requiring treatments: any period of incapacity due to or treatment for a chronic serious health condition (such as diabetes, epilepsy, asthma) which
      1. requires periodic visits for treatment by a healthcare provider at least twice a year; and
      2. continues over an extended period of time (including recurring episodes of a single underlying condition); and
      3. may cause episodic incapacity rather than a continuing period of incapacity.

    3. Any period of incapacity due to pregnancy, or for prenatal care.

    4. Permanent/long-term conditions: A period of Incapacity which is permanent or long-term due to a condition for which treatment may not be effective, but which requires the continuing supervision of a Health Care Provider. Examples include Alzheimer’s disease; terminal states of cancer; severe stroke.

    5. Multiple treatments for non-chronic conditions (such as chemotherapy; physical therapy):
      1. Restorative surgery after an accident or other injury; or
      2. a condition that would likely result in a period of incapacity of more than 3 consecutive full calendar days if the employee or employee’s family member did not receive treatment .

What is NOT Considered a Serious Health Condition?

There are many treatments or illnesses that are NOT considered a “serious health condition” under CT PFML law unless there are complications that require inpatient care or continuing treatment. Some examples that do not meet the definition of serious health condition include:

  • Routine examinations
  • Activities that can be and are initiated without a visit to a health care provider is not by itself sufficient for leave, such as taking over-the-counter medications (e.g., aspirin, antihistamines, or salves), bed-rest, drinking fluids, exercise, etc.
  • the common cold, the flu, earaches, upset stomach, minor ulcers, headaches other than migraines, routine dental or orthodontia problems, periodontal disease, etc. (unless complications arise).
  • cosmetic treatments, such as most treatments for acne or plastic surgery, unless inpatient hospital care is required or unless complications develop.

Note: There may be other situations like restorative dental or plastic surgery which may be covered if there is a serious health condition such as cancerous growths as part of the medical condition. Certain mental illnesses may also be covered. Leave may be taken only for certain substance abuse treatments and not for absences caused by an employee’s use of the substance.

 

5Incapacity means the inability to work, attend school or perform other regular daily activities due to the serious health condition, treatment of the serious health condition, or recovery from the serious health condition.

 


ShelterPoint* Is Your Partner For Paid Family & Medical Leave In Connecticut

184000+

NY EMPLOYERS^

1

NY STATUTORY SHORT-TERM DISABILITY PREMIUMS^^

1900000+

NY EMPLOYEES^

Specializing in Short-Term Disability Insurance and Paid Family Leave, it’s a natural next step for us to bring our expertise in this field to Connecticut; and we look forward to helping you navigate the requirements of this new law as the regulations and official program policies and procedures fall into place throughout 2021. We will continuously update and expand the content on this site as new information becomes available. Be sure to sign up for updates to stay in the loop.

As an approved private plan carrier in Connecticut, we welcome the opportunity to help CT employers based on our decades of experience in related, state-required coverages, so you can trust ShelterPoint to provide you a stand-alone Private Option for your Paid Family & Medical Leave needs.


^ Based upon ShelterPoint Life Insurance Company policyholder and certificate holder count as of 02/26/20.
^^ State of New York Workers’ Compensation Board, form DB-680, 2016 – applies to ShelterPoint Life Insurance Company only.

 

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*The ShelterPoint family of companies operates under the “ShelterPoint” name strictly as a marketing name, and no legal significance is expressed or implied. The ShelterPoint family of companies consists of ShelterPoint Life Insurance Company, a NY-domiciled carrier, and its wholly-owned subsidiary ShelterPoint Insurance Company, a FL-domiciled carrier, depending on the state. ShelterPoint is a registered service mark.

Connecticut Paid Family & Medical Leave is available in CT only and will be underwritten by: ShelterPoint Life Insurance Company (a New York - domiciled carrier; principal office in Garden City, NY): CT (SPL PFMLP 0122 CT).

This page is for informational purposes only and is not intended to provide legal counsel. Please consult with an appropriate professional for legal and compliance advice. Any CT PFML information is as of the page’s date stamp; it is based on the applicable statutes and regulations, and may change as regulations are released  or the Connecticut Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Authority issues guidance and/or policies and procedures  regarding Paid Family & Medical Leave.

 

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